GUT SOOTHING BONE BROTH

By Mona | Wednesday 1 February 2012 5:19 pm

GUT SOOTHING BONE BROTH

Yield: 7 quarts

Besides it’s culinary use, bone broth is loaded with nutrients and gentle on the gut.  According to Donna Gates of “The Body Ecology Diet” (http://bodyecology.com/articles/bone-broth), “Bone broth is rich in minerals to strengthen the immune system and support healthy digestion. Bone broth also contains collagen to strengthen tendons, joints, ligaments, bone, and skin and will help heal the lining of the gut to relieve heartburn, GERD, and other types of intestinal inflammation. On top of that, collagen will support healthy skin to make it supple and strong to reduce the appearance of cellulite.”

Bone broth is also a health supportive beverage to use as part of a cleanse. According to Dr. Mark Hyman in his book “The UltraSimple Diet”, “drinking 3-4 cups of broth a day helps to alkalinize the body from an acid-producing modern diet. Detoxification can only happen if we reduce the acidity in our bodies”.

When purchasing vegetables for the broth, try to buy organic. Most fruits and vegetables contain unacceptable and unsafe levels of pesticides, so it’s a wise choice to buy organic produce as often as you can.

 

Ingredients:

4 pounds grass-fed organic beef marrow bones *

Nature's Elixir

9 unpeeled carrots, cut into thirds

3 unpeeled medium yellow or red onions, cut into chunks

1 leek, white and green parts, cut into thirds

1 bunch celery, cut into thirds

2 unpeeled medium sweet potatoes, cut into chunks

1 unpeeled medium yam, cut into chunks

2 medium turnips, cut into chunks

2 medium parsnips, cut into thirds

6 unpeeled large garlic cloves, halved

1 bunch fresh flat-leaf parsley

1/2 bunch kale

1/2 bunch swiss chard

8 inch piece of ginger root, cut into slices

2 6-inch strips kombu (also known as kelp; dried sea vegetable that is a rich source of iodine and trace minerals) **

2 teaspoons black peppercorns

3 bay leaves

2 sprigs fresh thyme

2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

10 quarts water

sea salt to taste (since kombu is high in iodine, taste the broth before adding additional salt)

Procedure:

  1. Preheat oven to 350F.
  2. Place the bones on a baking sheet and roast for 30 minutes.
  3. Rinse all the vegetables well. Since, the vegetables are unpeeled, use a vegetable brush to scrub and clean them well.
  4. In a very large heavy stockpot, add all the ingredients, add water to cover, and bring to a boil.
  5. Uncover, reduce to a bare simmer, and skim any scum that rises to the surface.
  6. Simmer uncovered for 8 to 24 hours. A long and slow cook time is necessary in order to fully extract the nutrients in and around the bone. As the broth simmers, some of that water will evaporate.
  7. Remove and discard the bones, then strain the broth through a fine sieve and discard vegetables. Stir in salt to taste.
  8. Cool to room temperature, and store in a large tightly sealed glass container(s) in the refrigerator.
  9. Skim off any fat from the top of the broth. Broth can also be portioned into smaller containers and frozen for future use. Store in the refrigerator for up to 4 days or in the freezer for up to 4 months.

(Recipe adapted from “The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen”, by Rebecca Katz, Celestial Arts, 2009)

* You can use an assortment of different animal bones. Just make sure that all bones are sourced from animals that are organic and grass-fed or pastured and free-range. Everything that the animal ate, how it lived, and where it lived all factor into the health benefits of your broth. “Cattle were designed to eat grass, not grains. But farmers today feed their animals corn and soybeans, which fatten up the animals faster for slaughter. A recent comprehensive study found that compared with corn-fed beef, grass-fed beef is higher in beta-carotene, vitamin E, omega-3s, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), calcium, magnesium, and potassium.” – Dr. Mercola “Avoid These Seven Foods and You’re Off to a Healthier New Year”, December 29, 2009, www.mercola.com

Whole Foods sells frozen organic grass-fed beef bones in the frozen meat section. You can also ask the butcher if he has some in the back. Alternatively, order grass fed bones online from US Wellness Meats (www.uswellnessmeats.com).

**Dried Kombu strips are sold in Whole Foods.

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categories: Broths, News, Recipes

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